Now that’s hysterical. Even hylerical (which is a combination of hilarious and hysterical). You’re just sitting there, all by yourself, alone, staring at the screen, totally pretending that you are NOT awesome. Ha! You can’t fool me! I have my special You Rock Detection Antennae that can spot an amazing person at 300 feet. Bingo! Found you! You so ROCK! But we should have a little talk about your sweater fetish, though. Because that’s freaking me out.

WHAT’S UP IN BUFFILAND

Well, last week was amazing! I was honored to be one of the speakers at the Sprout Challenger Day where I talked to 700 entrepreneurs (NOT ‘undertakers’!) about How To Save Your Ass In English. Now at least 700 fewer people will say ‘I dressed myself this morning’- mission accomplished!

I also had a fabulous ’50 Shades of Great English!’ workshop at the American Book Center in Amsterdam, where I covered 50 tips in 50 minutes. It was fast and furious, and a good time was had by all!

I was also featured in the Spits! newspaper. Check it out!

JOIN ME!

I’ve put on my naughty shoes (no, not these, and no, it’s not an expression in English) and am hosting my first ever Rock Your English! event – join me on December 15th in Amsterdam. I even made a little film, your own personal invite! If you want to have a great time and Rock Your English, but don’t want to deal with my waiting lists (Hello, March), then this is the course for you. For less than 10 Euros an hour! Looking forward to seeing you there!

I LOF YOU FAIRY MUCH?!?

I made this 2 minute film (anouk check time of video?) to help you with the pronunciation of the V sound in English. Check it out!

STOP! GRAMMAR TIME!

Its or it’s? Well, it’s really easy! ‘It’s’ is short for ‘it is’ (an apostrophe always replaces a missing letter). We’d say ‘It’s raining so hard outside – maybe we should cancel our nude picnic?’ ‘Its’ means ‘belonging to’. ‘The dog wagged its tail when his owner came home with some Rock Your English! dog food.  (Hey, you never know!)

YOUR QUESTIONS – ANSWERED!

“Can you tell me when to use ‘at a restaurant’ and when to use ‘in a restaurant’? I’m lost! And hungry!” (via Twitter)

Well, darling, let me show you the way. You put on that sheep costume and I’ll get my shepherd suit and off we go! ‘I’ll meet you at the restaurant’ usually means you’ll meet the person outside. ‘I’ll meet you in the restaurant’ means you’ll be waiting inside for them. So put on your lipstick (oh, take off your sheep costume first!) and get going!

I’d love to spend some more delicious quality time in your inbox (the view is great from here because my newsletter is looking at your GORGEOUS face) but I’ve got to go – got an emergency studio job! He needs me. Desperately. 😉

Sending you the perfect high-heeled boots, personally delivered on a silver platter full of delicious delights, carried by the Playmate/Chippendale of your choice, the rest is up to you….,

Wit lof from buffi x